1962 Ford Falcon = $4200

Up for sale is a nice condtion Ford Falcon. It is a 1962 2 door. Engine size is 170. This car runs great. The glass is all in good condition, no cracks. Tires are good. The body is in good condition, some rust is visible. New carpet, new master cylinder, new shocks front and back, new carb, and generator replaced with alternator. I took a lot of pics, click on the photobucket link to see more… http://s661.photobucket.com/albums/uu339/bobby-ricigliano/ford%20falcon%201962/ If you are interested in seeing the car, email me your phone number or I will not respond.

Well it’s been awhile since I posted anything up here on Cars You Should Buy, but there’s a damned good reason for that… one that I can’t reveal just yet! However, while the cat’s away, the mice will play, and sure enough a quick perusal of Craigslist has dragged more than a few tantalizing vehicles across my monitor’s pixels. This ’62 Falcon is one such vehicle. If you’re a regular reader of CYSB, then you probably already know I’ve got a bit of a hard on for early Falcons, so the temptation of a ’62 Falcon coupe in red and black was just too much to overcome. As with all early Falcons, this one’s sure to be stone-axe reliable and quite fashionable to boot, while the 170 cubic inch engine and automatic gearbox are well-proven powertrain options easily capable of returning pretty decent fuel economy… if not barnstorming power.

However, it’s also not without its issues. As the seller mentions in the ad, there is some rust already visible on the body, and it’s reasonable to assume that the black paintjob isn’t a factory ‘job… in the early sixties, Ford was still lacquering their cars, and their version of the good ole single-stage black paint job was one that lasts absolutely forever… I should know, I had an old Ford pickup in the original gloss black lacquer. This car, on the other hand, appears to have a bit of a rough texture to the paint, which is something the factory finish never would have had. Sure, it would’ve oxidized and faded, but it never would have wrinkled. That said, it doesn’t look to be too bad, and anyone with a little spare time on their hands, some extremely smooth wet/dry sandpaper, and a power buffer could probably have it looking great in no time. Furthermore, although rust is cited in the ad, the engine bay photo shows a well-maintained motor with no signs of rust appearing around the strut towers now around the cowl, which is a very good sign on a car of this age. Likewise, these cars are famously easy collector cars to own, as parts availability is an utter non-issue, which means that anything that might need replacing is readily available and probably only slightly more expensive than dirt. All this, combined with the number of new parts included with the car, make it a pretty compelling vehicle, and one that’s perfectly suited to signal my return to Craigslist prowling! As always, click the blue text above to follow through to the advertisement and contact the seller.

1965 Ford F-250 – $3000

For sale is a 65 Ford three quarter ton camper special pick up truck. Has a 79 351 windsor V8 with an auto 3 speed. runs and drives strong, brakes are good, new tires. Asking $3000.00 obo. Call or email. 778-554-7805.

Although summer might have finally deigned those of us relegated to the lower mainland with it’s warm and dry disposition at long last, that doesn’t necessarily translate to drop-top season for everyone. In fact, for a great many people, it’s the time of the year when the automobile takes on its most tool-like properties. Flocking to the outdoors like sunburned lemmings off a heat baked cliff, people rapidly find their automobiles filling up with everything from bikes to boards to boxes of beer, and if you’re driving a Pontiac Firefly of VW Beetle, that can be worrisome. But fear not, because should you find yourself getting a little cramped in amongst the Pabst and single speed bikes, there is respite: this 1965 Ford F-250.

Looking every bit the hipster’s dream, this ’65 Ford F-250 demonstrates everything that was awesome about the mid-sixties: friendly, PlaySkool colours, simple styling, and rugged engineering. Of course, that translates into long stopping distances, questionable fuel economy, and quite possibly some of the heaviest steering ever encountered by man (I learned to drive in a ’73, and it took nearly my entire body mass to spin the tiller whilst stopped). However, what it undoubtedly lacks in capability compared to a modern truck, it more than makes up for in character and reliability. Having beaten my old truck around Richmond, New West, Vancouver, and Port Coquitlam for years after it served as my family’s camper-hauling vacation mobile (accruing something north of 450,000 kms on the way), the big black beast proved incapable of quitting, and served as my daily driver until it was finally traded in for a newer, and nowhere near as reliable truck. Why? Because well modern trucks may stop quicker, go faster, sip gas, and roll their own windows down, they’re also extremely complex. These old Ford pickups having roughly 3.4 moving parts, making them only slightly more complicated than your bottle opener… and how often does that fail? Looking in especially good shape, it’s nearly a guarantee that the paint is new, so do yourself a favour and either bring a trained ear or a magnet to check for fiberglass and bondo beneath. Rust is extremely common on these old trucks, with the worst offenders being the rear of the cab and the cab supports, but replacement parts are readily available from the absolutely mammoth and especially rabid support network that’s cropped up for these old truck. I truly miss my old one, as these old Ford’s represent what I hold to be the golden era in automotive design and manufacture, and it’s the one vehicle of the hundreds I’ve driven that I wish I could have back again… so if this one looks good to you, go ahead and click on the Craigslist ad up top, before I do.

1966 Ford Thunderbird – $2950

“Restoration project car, 1966 Thunderbird, 390, big block, runs great! New carb, rebuilt transmission. She is in good shape, and daily drivable. Needs some work and T.L.C., not show worthy, Please only call if you understand what that entails. $2950, to a good home. Please contact Nick at 778-891-3284, no emails.”

Looking at this particular example of automotive history, it’s hard to believe that this car’s forebears could have ever come out of a desire to compete directly with the Chevrolet Corvette. By 1966, just 11 years had passed since the then-new Thunderbird shamed the Corvette with superior horsepower figures and performance, but those 11 years had not been kind to the Thunderbird. While 1966 saw the mighty 427 big block ushered under the Corvette’s shapely hood, Ford spent the year escorting the Thunderbird’s big, luxurious fourth generation from the premises in order to make way for a newer, bigger, and vastly uglier fifth generation. Marking the last year that the Thunderbird could be called legitimately good looking, the 1966 model year features a trio of V8’s underhood (275- and 315-horsepower 390 cubic inch V8s as well as a 345-horsepower 428 cubic inch) and enough luxury features inside to sink a ship… which was ironic given the ‘bird’s land yacht status. The new Highway Pilot Automatic Speed Control set a new standard for cruise control systems, while the six way power seats ensured complete comfort for the driver and his passenger, and both new features were merely bolstering the already impressive list of amenities that included easy-ingress and egress rotating seats, tilting steering columns, power windows and locks, and a variety of other contrivances.

Of course, the downside to all these relatively complex luxury systems is that ownership of aging Thunderbirds could be a troublesome and trying experience. But, they say nothing unites people like a common foe, and few enthusiast groups are more cohesive and helpful than Thunderbird enthusiasts. With a strong aftermarket to support their penchant for replacement parts and a huge knowledge base, it can be surprisingly easy to keep one of these cars on the road. However, this being B.C., and these being cars festooned with trim and panel joints, it’s extremely important that any potential buyer do their due diligence and inspect for rust. However, if the photos are any illustration, it looks like it’s in relatively decent shape, although it looks like there’s something around the rear wheelarch that might need investigating. Clicking through to the actual ad will demonstrate the benefits of a proper hard top on an old car such as this, as the interior (what we can see of it, anyway) looks quite clean. But perhaps most telling is the inclusion of “to a good home” in the price. After putting in what appears to be a few of his own dollars, obviously the owner still cares about this old car, and that’s a really great thing to see. These are great cars that can still work as reliably as they did when they were new, and they’re extremely pleasant to drive on a daily basis, making this one yet another car you should buy.

1965 Ford Fairlane – $4000

“1965 Ford Fairlane Sport Coupe. 289, Automatic transmission, bucket seats and console. Power Steering. 121,000 documented miles. $4,000 firm. 604-813-9640, after 10 am.”

Well, once again, we find ourselves staring down the barrel (or four barrel) of yet another version of the eminently popular Ford Fairlane, this particular model being a fetching 1965 Sport Coupe. One of the older Fairlanes that have come across CYSB’s browser, ’65 marks the final year for the fourth generation of the popular Fairlane sedan, a generation that saw the Fairlane shrink to become Ford’s intermediate vehicle. Slotting between the new Ford Falcon and the equally new full-size Ford Galaxie, the fourth generation Fairlane offered a wide array of optional extras and varying body styles ranging from faux-wood adorned Squire station wagons to ridiculous 657 horsepower, 7.0L Thunderbolt drag cars.

This particular model, being a 289-powered Sport Coupe, is positioned somewhere in the upper reaches of the Fairlane model lineup. I suspect it is the 2-barrel carbureted, hydraulic-lifter equipped 289 producing 195 horsepower have been informed it’s a factory four barrel, dual exhaust car, making it a prime exemplar of the upper echelon of Fairlane performance in 1965. Producing a healthy 271 horsepower, this engine gives a good indication of just how easy power comes to the ubiquitous Ford small block. Regardless, with just over a ton and half’s worth of American sheetmetal to cart around, neither of the torquey V8s available in ’65 would have much trouble carting it around. However, with just three forward speeds available from the automatic gearbox, don’t expect stellar fuel mileage. But at just $4,000, and looking pretty much flawless, fuel costs might be the only dollars this car needs put into it.