1973 MG MGB – $3350

Please help – this great little runner sits in my carport and begs for someone to take it for a spin on a regular basis! Unfortunately, I do not have the time to do so… It runs great – quite some work done to the motor (new carb, new headgasket, sparks etc.), new tires, new carpets and more… Just put in a new fan-belt! Great “project” car for someone who has time & love & wants to drive a classic convertible! All it really needs is a paint-job if you wanted it to look splendid! Still insured, so come by & take it for a spin! Put some love & TLC in it & it will be a fantastic MGB! Asking $3350 OBO – make me an offer! Will consider trade for 1985 – 1992 BMW 318i or 325i convertible, manual transmission in proper running condition 🙂 

If you’re looking for a car with which you can enjoy the coming months, well, you may have just found it with this cheap MGB. The quintessential sports car by any and all measures, the MGB has provided the world with the very definition of the term for decades, having been in continual production for 22 years. Beginning in 1960, the classically proportioned and handsome MGB roadster saw three different iterations during its long production run, with the Mark II’s production beginning in 1967, and the Mark III in 1972. This being a ’73, it bears out the improvements that made a Mark III (improved dashboard and heater assembly), but manages to escape the ugliness that came along with 1974’s more stringent crash safety standard and the associated rubber bumper overriders.

Of course, as one of the world’s best-selling sports cars (the Miata only recently claimed that title from the MGB a few years ago), owning an MGB is ridiculously easy. Parts are both widely available as well as quite inexpensive, and the owners groups, clubs, and general proliferation of MGB info makes finding manuals and maintenance instructions as easy as locating a good recipe for bread. Furthermore, they’re uncommonly pleasant to drive, with responsive, lively handling and decent power from the 1.8 litre inline four. Granted, you won’t be setting a blistering pace around Laguna or Mugello with one, but they’ve got quite comfortable interiors, a pleasant ride that doesn’t punish, and return MPG figures in the mid 20’s. This particular example won’t be the prettiest MGB many will have laid eyes upon, but these cars are quite mechanically robust, which means it could be excellent candidate for weeknight restoration work between weekend runs up the Duffy Lake Road. Again, clicking the blue text above will take you through to the ad for contact info.

Advertisements

1973 Land Rover Forward Control – $25000

“1973 Land Rover 101 Forward Control, 1.5L 3B diesel with AXT turbocharger; 5 speed gearbox. ARB diff lockers front and rear; electric 10,000 lb. winch; custom free-wheeling hubs. Six Michelin tires. Very low mileage for its age. Comes with brand new canvas (not shown). For appointment to view, contact Jay 604-760-5350. Currently in storage.”

When it comes to awesome vehicles, the Land Rover 101″ Forward Control is right near the top of the list. A little known variant of the brand’s all-conquering Series IIA and Series III trucks, the forward control fulfilled the British military’s need for an air-transportable 1-tonne utility truck, and did so in much the same manner as did Volvo’s Laplander and Steyr-Puch’s Pinzgauer. Produced in a variety of formats for the military alone (there were no civilian forward controls manufactured), the forward control could be had in radio car, ambulance, and truck layouts, with varying body styles and widths befitting their specific roles; radio trucks typically possess an enclosed shell that is no wider than the front end, while ambulances bulge outward to allow additional room for stretchers and medical equipment. Trucks, such as the one pictured here, feature your standard issue, military-style folding bed sides and typically benefit from the fitment of a hoop set and canvas roof.

Although this blog may be called “Cars You Should Buy,” I fear this first entry after the holiday season breaks with tradition and brings you a car you most certainly should not, regardless of how cool it may appear. Having had the unfortunate fortune of undergoing an engine and transmission swap at some point, the truck has lost one of its best features; the ability to use a huge amount of standard Land Rover parts. Whilst Laplanders, Pinzgauers, and even Unimogs are specific vehicles with very little parts sharing with their stablemates, the 101 utilized much of the same running gear as the regular Land Rover Series IIA and III trucks, which means that any current owner can take advantage of a huge parts supply network. Of course, that pedestrian design also makes it a bit less capable than the similarly-sized, portal-axle-equipped forward control trucks from Steyr, Volvo, and Mercedes, and the prices typically reflect that. It also doesn’t help that due to their relatively awkward looks, punishing ride, and niche status, they simply don’t command much of a market. Readily available in the UK for around nine grand in restored condition, and typically carrying a $2,500 shipping cost, this truck’s $25,000 price tag is absolutely ridiculous. But, if nothing else, it does serve as a great excuse to search eBay Motors UK for a better one. As always, interested parties can click the blue text alongside the topmost picture to navigate to the seller’s Craigslist ad… but I wouldn’t recommend it.

1973 Dodge Dart – $900

 

“1973 Dodge Dart Slant 6 – 225, runs well but not aircared at the moment. Low km as I can tell (80,000). Only 1000km on tires. Some spare parts included.”

If the Ford Fairlane was the darling poster child of the American sedan before 1970, the Dodge Dart has to be numbered among the same in the post-fuel crisis era of the early ’70s. Currying much favour with American car buyers thanks to its relatively small stature and thrifty, reliable, and famous slant six engines, the ’73 Dart was the perfect car for an America starving for fuel and buried under excessive insurance costs. As if that wasn’t enough hardship for the contemporary car buying public, an increased level of safety awareness led the American government to require all passenger vehicle be fitted with bumpers the size of small boats, and the result was the complete and utter ruination of the entire American auto industry’s various styling departments. A step that would even ugly up the indomitably attractive Jaguar E-type, the poor Dodge Dart never stood a chance. But, even with an overture to safety hanging off the front end, it wasn’t a bad car. Revised disc brakes, electronic ignition, a better starter motor, and a new engine subframe meant the cars were easier to maintain, while a different rear end kept costs down. Under the hood, the 225 cubic inch slant six made an advertised 105 horsepower and 185 foot pounds of torque; figures that were artificially deflated due to the then-new requirement that engines be tested with all ancillary accessories attached. Just two years prior, before the passage of that particular law, the same engine had been producing 145 horsepower and 215 foot-pounds of torque.

Undoubtedly, however, the passage of a few years’ time will have let a few ponies out from this particular Dart’s stable. Looking like one of the lower-spec trim levels (clicking through to the ad will undoubtedly surprise many new car owners who didn’t know seats could look so spartan!), potential buyers shouldn’t be dissuaded by the cars age, these things run forever. The ad doesn’t specify which transmission is behind that little slant six, but the smart money’s on an automatic, which will make for one easily maintained ride. Additionally, as long as rust hasn’t taken a hold in the trunk, floors, or quarter panels, most of these old Dodge’s come with a pretty thick coat of paint that, although typically heavily oxidized, will come up to a pretty good sheen with a little polish and wax. And although it’s once-handsome visage might have been pillaged by the safety police, a cleaned up ’73 Dart sedan would still be a pretty slick looking ride… especially when it’s just $900!

1973 Volvo P1800ES – $3500

“Rare 1973 Volvo P1800 ES wagon for restoration. Was restored in the early 90’s. Complete with registration. Automatic, air cond. Front seats are rough, rest of interior is decent . Good project or parts car. Was running when parked. Asking $3500.00. Email for more details.”

It seems as it Volvo’s been trying to change they brand image since the dawn of time. Having made more than their fair share of reliable and safe brick-mobiles, Volvo’s first attempt to slough off their staid image was a complete and utter flop. Selling just 68 examples, the Volvo P1900 was quickly determined to a be a failure, and just four years after its demise, Volvo released this: the P1800. Immediately taking hold of the market courtesy of its stylish good looks, excellent road manners, and sublime interior, the P1800 sold almost 40,000 units over the dozen years it was made, with the coupe station wagon wagon, the P1800ES selling an additional 8,077 units in the two short years it was made.

With a pleasant 2.0L four pot under the shapely hood, this particular car left the factory with an decent 125 horsepower; five less than the coupe version of the same car. Although the downgrade was as simple as bolting on a thicker head gasket to lower the fuel injected motor’s compression ratio, many contemporary critics felt the change actually improved the car’s performance, making it less peaky and more driveable. Now, as far as this particular P1800ES goes, it obviously looks as if it could use some work. In fact, it looks rough enough that I contemplated keeping it out of the blog on behalf of its condition… but I took heart from the fact that it was the recipient of a recent restoration, which gives me at least a little hope that it may be a decent candidate for someone with a modicum of mechanical know-how. Being a Volvo, these aren’t vehicles renowned for their unreliability (one actually holds the record as the most well-travelled car in the world with over 3 million miles), so with a little bit of elbow grease, I wouldn’t be surprised to see it back on the road in relatively short order. Also, with a very active enthusiast community and even a local club, owning a P1800 in Vancouver is, apparently, very easy.