1973 MG MGB – $3350

Please help – this great little runner sits in my carport and begs for someone to take it for a spin on a regular basis! Unfortunately, I do not have the time to do so… It runs great – quite some work done to the motor (new carb, new headgasket, sparks etc.), new tires, new carpets and more… Just put in a new fan-belt! Great “project” car for someone who has time & love & wants to drive a classic convertible! All it really needs is a paint-job if you wanted it to look splendid! Still insured, so come by & take it for a spin! Put some love & TLC in it & it will be a fantastic MGB! Asking $3350 OBO – make me an offer! Will consider trade for 1985 – 1992 BMW 318i or 325i convertible, manual transmission in proper running condition 🙂 

If you’re looking for a car with which you can enjoy the coming months, well, you may have just found it with this cheap MGB. The quintessential sports car by any and all measures, the MGB has provided the world with the very definition of the term for decades, having been in continual production for 22 years. Beginning in 1960, the classically proportioned and handsome MGB roadster saw three different iterations during its long production run, with the Mark II’s production beginning in 1967, and the Mark III in 1972. This being a ’73, it bears out the improvements that made a Mark III (improved dashboard and heater assembly), but manages to escape the ugliness that came along with 1974’s more stringent crash safety standard and the associated rubber bumper overriders.

Of course, as one of the world’s best-selling sports cars (the Miata only recently claimed that title from the MGB a few years ago), owning an MGB is ridiculously easy. Parts are both widely available as well as quite inexpensive, and the owners groups, clubs, and general proliferation of MGB info makes finding manuals and maintenance instructions as easy as locating a good recipe for bread. Furthermore, they’re uncommonly pleasant to drive, with responsive, lively handling and decent power from the 1.8 litre inline four. Granted, you won’t be setting a blistering pace around Laguna or Mugello with one, but they’ve got quite comfortable interiors, a pleasant ride that doesn’t punish, and return MPG figures in the mid 20’s. This particular example won’t be the prettiest MGB many will have laid eyes upon, but these cars are quite mechanically robust, which means it could be excellent candidate for weeknight restoration work between weekend runs up the Duffy Lake Road. Again, clicking the blue text above will take you through to the ad for contact info.

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1971 MGB GT – $2500

“Car has been sitting in an underground for 9 years. Body of car in great shape. Engine fuel line in need of repair. Call 778 882 8459”

There’s been a lot of American cars on here over the months. Maybe it’s just their dominance in the overall market, or perhaps it’s the undesirable and neglected periods they go through, but for whatever reason old European cars seem to hold their value quite a bit better. Which makes stumbling across something an uncommon as an MGB GT like this such a great find. A Pininifarina designed shooting brake version of the popular MGB sports car, the MGB GT was pretty much identical to its unquestionably more popular drop-top brother, but benefits from beefed up suspension components, in order to deal with the coupe’s added weight. Only marginally slower than the convertible, the GT proved enviably practical; it’s two-door station wagon (also known in Europe as a shooting brake) layout giving legitimate, if cramped, 2+2 seating and a relative dirth of cargo space beneath the rakish rear hatch. After debuting in 1965, the MGB GT saw its demise in North America in 1974, although worldwide exports continued all the way into 1980.

 

The fact that many of the car’s components are identical to the MGB’s makes buying up a second hand MBG GT a very logical way to enter into classic car ownership: as one of the most popular sports cars ever produced, you could probably build an MGB from the ground up with the restoration components available from aftermarket suppliers. In fact, perhaps the largest difference between buying an MGB and an MGB GT is that you needn’t worry so much about the environment’s effects on the car’s interior with the hard top. After all, no one’s ever left the roof off an MGB GT overnight in the rain! But it’s not all roses; as with all old British cars, rust can be a real problem. Check the sills very thoroughly, as they are both rust prone and incredibly important to the car’s unibody construction, likewise with the floors, and trunk. Thankfully, being a car that’s just emerged from 9 years of indoor storage, hopefully it’s in good shape body-wise. Finally, don’t be scared off by the mechanical woes of this particular vehicle, as their simplicity is probably only matched by the cheapness of their parts! Click the blue text to follow through to the ad.