1962 Ford Falcon = $4200

Up for sale is a nice condtion Ford Falcon. It is a 1962 2 door. Engine size is 170. This car runs great. The glass is all in good condition, no cracks. Tires are good. The body is in good condition, some rust is visible. New carpet, new master cylinder, new shocks front and back, new carb, and generator replaced with alternator. I took a lot of pics, click on the photobucket link to see more… http://s661.photobucket.com/albums/uu339/bobby-ricigliano/ford%20falcon%201962/ If you are interested in seeing the car, email me your phone number or I will not respond.

Well it’s been awhile since I posted anything up here on Cars You Should Buy, but there’s a damned good reason for that… one that I can’t reveal just yet! However, while the cat’s away, the mice will play, and sure enough a quick perusal of Craigslist has dragged more than a few tantalizing vehicles across my monitor’s pixels. This ’62 Falcon is one such vehicle. If you’re a regular reader of CYSB, then you probably already know I’ve got a bit of a hard on for early Falcons, so the temptation of a ’62 Falcon coupe in red and black was just too much to overcome. As with all early Falcons, this one’s sure to be stone-axe reliable and quite fashionable to boot, while the 170 cubic inch engine and automatic gearbox are well-proven powertrain options easily capable of returning pretty decent fuel economy… if not barnstorming power.

However, it’s also not without its issues. As the seller mentions in the ad, there is some rust already visible on the body, and it’s reasonable to assume that the black paintjob isn’t a factory ‘job… in the early sixties, Ford was still lacquering their cars, and their version of the good ole single-stage black paint job was one that lasts absolutely forever… I should know, I had an old Ford pickup in the original gloss black lacquer. This car, on the other hand, appears to have a bit of a rough texture to the paint, which is something the factory finish never would have had. Sure, it would’ve oxidized and faded, but it never would have wrinkled. That said, it doesn’t look to be too bad, and anyone with a little spare time on their hands, some extremely smooth wet/dry sandpaper, and a power buffer could probably have it looking great in no time. Furthermore, although rust is cited in the ad, the engine bay photo shows a well-maintained motor with no signs of rust appearing around the strut towers now around the cowl, which is a very good sign on a car of this age. Likewise, these cars are famously easy collector cars to own, as parts availability is an utter non-issue, which means that anything that might need replacing is readily available and probably only slightly more expensive than dirt. All this, combined with the number of new parts included with the car, make it a pretty compelling vehicle, and one that’s perfectly suited to signal my return to Craigslist prowling! As always, click the blue text above to follow through to the advertisement and contact the seller.

1966 Chevrolet Stepside Pickup – $3200

“I have an old 1966 Chevrolet stepside truck for sale. It is a straight 6, 4-speed manual truck. It runs and drives great. It has a good body on it. No issues, just cosmetic. Doesn’t leak… Its a great runner. Drove all the way to Hope and back last week no problem. Good on gas too! Everything works on the truck including the horn, signals, headlights, wipers, tail lights, brake lights, gauges, original am radio, interior dome light. It has nice oak fencing on the box which is fairly new. Professionally done to haul firewood and whatever. it has a plywood sheet for the bed and the original wood for the bed is bad so the plywood sheet does the trick. It gets looks where ever I go. Has a bit of rust on rocker and cab corners, but patch work or replacing doesn’t cost much. Dont want to bother painting it because it is a great work truck that gets a lot of attention. I have extra parts. If you buy this truck, you drive it away. AGAIN NO LEAKS AND SUPER EASY TO WORK ON. It truly is a great driver. $3200 bucks …. call 604-725-8449.”

Well, as anyone that’s up into the wee hours can tell you, Vancouver’s evenings have recently taken on that cold bite of moist air that’s been the harbinger of Fall in this region for eons. Rolling in on the building evening fog each night, Autumn signifies shorter days and colder weather ahead and is sure to be accompanied by an ever present threat of precipitation, be it either of the liquid or solid variety. And so too shall it come to pass that car enthusiasts and collectors all over the lower mainland will nestle their prized possessions away for another year. But that doesn’t mean you need to consign yourself to the crappy taupe Corolla in the driveway, at least not so long as there are vehicles like this available. Representing the first year of the Chevrolet C/K pickup truck, this 1966 Chevrolet stepside is the perfect companion for the terrible weather we’ll soon be facing down, and hails from an era in which Chevrolet pickup trucks saw success on a scale that they’d never known before. Recognizing that custom tailoring was a surefire way to win sales, Chevrolet significantly upped their options list for the ’62 model year, offering a whopping 203 different varieties and combinations of pickup truck. Subsequently, sales rose… a lot. In fact, for the three years of ’64, ’65, and ’66, the Chevrolet pickup truck set all-time sales records for Chevrolet, due in large part to that simple fact that buyers could have it any way they wanted it.

This of course means that now, many decades removed from their heyday, you’re pretty much guaranteed never to see another one just like this. The combination of a straight six, manual gearbox, and stepside box means it was probably ordered as a basic work truck, which in turn makes its good condition all the more appreciable. Of course, there are some issues: there are some dents to be found along the hood and what looks to be some wrinkling along the leading edge of the driver’s door, but if the ad is to be believed, it’s at least mechanically sound.  And should any of those dinged or dented parts prove simply too irksome to withstand, there are all manner of online and mail order companies prepared to sell both reproduction and NOS parts for these particular trucks, and the aftermarket support seems to grow by the day for these early C/K pickups. Rapidly gaining merit as a legitimate collector’s truck (as opposed to the frequently hot-rodded ’67 through ’72 models), more and more of these are being bought up by collectors and restorers. This in turn is making them harder and harder to find in workable condition such as this, which is precisely what landed this particular truck a feature here on CYSB: you wouldn’t feel bad tossing a set of skis, a mountain bike, or a beer keg in the back and heading out for some fun. However, any potential buyer would be well served to address the rust the seller has mentioned before winter truly hits, and would be even better served to spend a few days underneath the truck with a paintbrush and some POR-15 to prevent further rot from taking hold. But, overall, a great old truck that’d really be easy for a first time classic car buyer to hop into and enjoy, without the headaches something rarer or more complex might bring.

1969 Volkswagen Type 3 – $3700

1969 VW Type 3, automatic v1600 dual port lowered new mags and tires. Call Dan 604-314-7483.

Although 95% of humanity equates Volkswagen’s existence pre-1974 with the Beetle (the other 5% are intrepid enough to recall the Type 2, or Bus, undoubtedly through a haze of acid trips and marijuana smoke), the reality is that Volkswagen actually offered more than just their tiny rear-engined runabout for public consumption. Like this: the Type 3. More frequently seen in its squareback, station-wagon-esque format, the Volkswagen Type 3 debuted in 1961 as the predecessor to what would become the first generation Passat. Slightly larger than the Beetle and subsequently offering a substantial increase in both passenger and cargo space, the Type 3 retained the famous Volkswagen rear-engined, rear-wheel drive layout made famous by the Beetle, but possessed a larger 1500cc engine (enlarged to 1600cc in ’65) and could be had in four distinct body styles throughout its run, ranging from a small notchback coupé to a flowing sports coupé (better known as a Karmann Ghia here in North America), to squared-off two-door wagon known in the North American market as a squareback, to a flowing fastback coupé body unveiled in 1965. Although relatively popular in Europe, the Type 3 struggled to get a foothold in North America, with the notchback model specifically having trouble finding buyers over its sportier, and more practical siblings.

Which is precisely what makes this one so alluring. Having been produced in 1969, this Type 3 is of a particularly good vintage, coming out one year before Volkswagen muddled the design with a refresh in 1970, but after the adoption of the larger 1600cc engine and front disc brakes in ’66. Of course, being a Volkswagen engine, there’s absolutely no shortage of parts and aftermarket supplies available for it, and it’s entirely reasonable to expect the little four cylinder to keep chugging away for years to come. Sadly, bodywork is a different story, and the rarity of the Type 3 notchback will undoubtedly make any future repairs or parts replacements a bit… er… challenging. That said, Volkswagen owners aren’t so much fanatical about the brand quite so much as they worship it as a surrogate religion, so there’s undoubtedly quite a strong support network of individuals that would be happy to keep an automotive oddity like this on the road! Being a Volkswagen, the maintenance and running order of the drivetrain should take a very, very distant second place to ascertaining the solidity of the bodywork, so bring along your best Bondo-tapping knuckle and/or magnet collection before inspecting this little VW. But given the price point, and the crazy following classic Volkswagen’s enjoy, don’t be surprised if this one goes quick. As always, click on the blue text up top to go to the ad and contact the seller.

1965 Ford F-250 – $3000

For sale is a 65 Ford three quarter ton camper special pick up truck. Has a 79 351 windsor V8 with an auto 3 speed. runs and drives strong, brakes are good, new tires. Asking $3000.00 obo. Call or email. 778-554-7805.

Although summer might have finally deigned those of us relegated to the lower mainland with it’s warm and dry disposition at long last, that doesn’t necessarily translate to drop-top season for everyone. In fact, for a great many people, it’s the time of the year when the automobile takes on its most tool-like properties. Flocking to the outdoors like sunburned lemmings off a heat baked cliff, people rapidly find their automobiles filling up with everything from bikes to boards to boxes of beer, and if you’re driving a Pontiac Firefly of VW Beetle, that can be worrisome. But fear not, because should you find yourself getting a little cramped in amongst the Pabst and single speed bikes, there is respite: this 1965 Ford F-250.

Looking every bit the hipster’s dream, this ’65 Ford F-250 demonstrates everything that was awesome about the mid-sixties: friendly, PlaySkool colours, simple styling, and rugged engineering. Of course, that translates into long stopping distances, questionable fuel economy, and quite possibly some of the heaviest steering ever encountered by man (I learned to drive in a ’73, and it took nearly my entire body mass to spin the tiller whilst stopped). However, what it undoubtedly lacks in capability compared to a modern truck, it more than makes up for in character and reliability. Having beaten my old truck around Richmond, New West, Vancouver, and Port Coquitlam for years after it served as my family’s camper-hauling vacation mobile (accruing something north of 450,000 kms on the way), the big black beast proved incapable of quitting, and served as my daily driver until it was finally traded in for a newer, and nowhere near as reliable truck. Why? Because well modern trucks may stop quicker, go faster, sip gas, and roll their own windows down, they’re also extremely complex. These old Ford pickups having roughly 3.4 moving parts, making them only slightly more complicated than your bottle opener… and how often does that fail? Looking in especially good shape, it’s nearly a guarantee that the paint is new, so do yourself a favour and either bring a trained ear or a magnet to check for fiberglass and bondo beneath. Rust is extremely common on these old trucks, with the worst offenders being the rear of the cab and the cab supports, but replacement parts are readily available from the absolutely mammoth and especially rabid support network that’s cropped up for these old truck. I truly miss my old one, as these old Ford’s represent what I hold to be the golden era in automotive design and manufacture, and it’s the one vehicle of the hundreds I’ve driven that I wish I could have back again… so if this one looks good to you, go ahead and click on the Craigslist ad up top, before I do.

1961 Ford Falcon – $4500

1961 Ford Falcon. 2 door, auto, 200 6cyl, C4 transmission, 60k original miles, bone dry, solid no rust. Body: solid floors, chrome package, new rad,brakes,custom exhaust, tires, gas tank & sender, battery, alternator. Lots, lots more. Air cared, great daily driver, ready to go! $4500. Car is located in Langley. Call 604-8571896 after 3pm or weekends. 

Although the Mustang may have gotten the lion’s share of the headlines back in the ’60s, the reality is this: it never would have happened without the venerable little Falcon. Ford’s not-quite-as-popular economy car, the Falcon provided many a young person with reasonably affordable new transportation for the ten years between 1960 and 1970, and formed the underpinnings for what would become the fastest-selling car ever: the ‘64.5 Ford Mustang. Of course, there were some differences, as the Falcon was never really treated to the same high performance aspirations as the Mustang. Subsequently, many were outfitted with automatic transmissions and an inline six cylinder, which in 1961 meant either 90 or 101 horsepower, depending on the engine option (buyers could choose between the lower-output 144 cubic inch motor, or the higher output 170 cubic inch motor). At the time, neither of the overbuilt and understressed engines were considered horribly underpowered, and the Falcon quickly earned a reputation for spunky performance coupled with steadfast reliability and reasonably economy.

However, this one’s obviously been treated to an engine swap at some point in its lifetime, as the 200 cubic inch six cylinder advertised was in fact released in 1963; two years after this car left the assembly line. A four-main bearing engine, like the 170 c.i., the 200 c.i. engine was pretty much better in every way, and saw nearly continuous service well into the ’80s. Although I personally am hesitant to blindly suggest purchasing an obviously modified car, the fact that this Falcon was treated to a logical upgrade and retains an automatic transmission (rather than having had a V8 and four speed bolted in) would seem to indicate that the engine swap was done to effect substantial repairs rather than get a bit more speed, which in turn says something about the maturity of the person that did the engine swap. A quick check of the engine block’s freeze plugs could help indicate when the engine was replaced as well, as 1965 and later 200’s have five freeze plugs. Should this engine prove be the older example, with three freeze plugs, the replacement may very well have been handled by the local Ford dealership. And beyond the engine controversy, this particular Falcon looks amazingly good. Although the white paint may prove devilishly capable of hiding dings, dents, rust bubbles, and any other surface irregularities, the Falcon’s cult following and low public profile means many weren’t treated to the evils their more desirable Mustang-badged brethren have had to endure in recent years at the hands of immature owners. Chances are, between the condition of the paint, details (check out the door latch in one of the photos!), wheels, and interior, I’d be willing to bet this car’s lived in the garage you can see in the fourth photo for quite some time, and thus has avoided a lot of exposure to the elements. With a massive amount of parts support thanks to a large number of shared parts, an incredibly simple mechanical layout that invites an owner’s education, and it’s beautifully aging looks, it’s entirely reasonable to say that this pretty little coupe could make an amazing commuter. And even if it should require some moderate rust repair or paintwork to be brought back to peak condition, with a price tag of just $4,500, it’s an incredibly good deal, and would still be way cheaper and vastly cooler than pretty much every modern economy car. As ever, to visit the ad and see a few more photos, click on the blue text above.

1964 Mercedes Benz 220 – $2500

“1964 Mercedes 220, gasoline straight-6 cylinder, twin carbs, 4-speed column shifter. The car looks and runs well, but is testing slightly below emissions requirements. Contact Susan at 778-828-8993.”

In 1964, if you were a wealthy young man, you lusted after the likes of Ford’s Mustang or Ferrari’s GTO. If you were a wealthy old man, you probably found yourself looking for a Rolls Royce or Bentley. And if you were a wealthy despot, it would be a Mercedes sedan that filled your dreams. Big, comfy, understated, and yet gloriously luxurious in top trim, they were the perfect car for the discerning dictator. Spanning a price range that brought their sedan line from basic, but solidly built runabouts all the way up to super-luxury limos, Mercedes offered three different chassis codes in the mid-sixties, with the popular WIII code indicating those two- and four-door chassis fitted with the venerable 2.2 litre six cylinder (W110 indicates four cylinder-powered cars, while W112s received the 3.0L inline six).

This specific car, a W111 220Sb, represents the middle of the W111 lineup. Thanks to the dual carburettors, it boasted 15 more horsepower than the base 220b, bringing the total to 110, but still rallied 10 horsepower less under the hood than the rare Bosch fuel injection-equipped 220SEb. Good for a top speed of 103 miles per hour, it was no slouch out on the Autobahn, but it’s considerable mass and long gearing conspired against it under acceleration, and the 220Sb struggled with a lethargic 15-second 0-60 time. However, when you’re in the interior of a car like this, replete with possibly the most interesting gauge arrangement ever, you may appreciate the slower pace the big Benz requires. And as the most popular of the W111s, the 220Sb is a relatively common collector’s vehicle, and still boasts a pretty staunch enthusiast base. However, that doesn’t make it the easiest vehicle to own, with parts prices and availability requiring both a serious level of commitment to source and purchase. But, this is a unique vehicle offered at a great price, and given their continued rarity, there’s no doubt in my mind that they’re on the cusp of becoming very, very desirable automobiles indeed. And although it may be testing slightly below Aircare requirements, the popularity and robustness of the 2.2L six cylinder ensures that any mechanical issues should be easily rectified. And hey, who knows how much longer we’ll even have Aircare for, anyway!

1963 Jaguar Mark X – $7000

“1963 Jaguar Mark Ten: [Selling because I don’t have time to work on it!]
Description:
– Engine Specifications: 6 cyl, 3.8 litre XK Jaguar ‘S’ type engine; 255 BHP at 5,500 RPM
– Transmission: 4 speed Manual with overdrive,
– Left Hand Drive

– Independent Front & Rear suspension
– Interior: 4 door, 5 seats, luxury front console,

Largest, luxury vehicle manufactured by Jaguar. Almost entirely original features and accessories; including tool kit. Needs some restoration. 36,000 miles showing on original odometer. Original Documentation and brochures. Vehicle is fully functional. Engine runs well. Some aesthetic restoration needed.”

If I’m honest, this particular entry into CYSB immortality might be a little self serving: the Jaguar Mark X/420G has always been a personal dream car of mine. My father has owned a 1974 Jaguar XJ12L for as long as I can remember, and although that car’s combination of grace, space, and pace may leave little to be desired, I always found myself flipping his Classic and Sports Car magazine open to they’re early ’90s expose on Jaguar’s biggest luxury barge. Positively gargantuan and in many ways a would-be competitor for the Bentleys and Rollers of the day, the Mark X borrowed heavily from the popular XKE sports car, stealing both its legendary inline six engine and a widened version of its independent rear suspension. The first Jaguar sedan to feature their well-know suspension system, the Mark X was well-regarded as being a very well sorted car when it came to ride and handling, but would quickly be panned as underpowered. With a curb weight of almost 4,200 pounds and a paltry 3.8 litres’ worth of displacement under the hood, acceleration was tepid for the Mark X, and sales lagged in the all-important American marketplace that was drunk on the power provided by 8.2 litre Cadillac V8s. Jaguar attempted to fix the problem in 1966 with the release of a larger inline six that now displaced 4.2 litres, but the subsequently known 420G fared little better than its predecessor.

However if you’re anything like me, you would rather spend as much time cosseted by the Mark X’s ridiculously English mix of leather and burled walnut as possible, so that brilliant but overladen powertrain isn’t really an issue. With styling that is at once both understated and somehow ostentatious, the Mark X looks almost as good as the Rolls Royces and Bentleys it went up against, and has certainly aged just as well. But it’s the interior that I really love. With wraparound walnut trim, folding tray tables for the back seat, silly amounts of space, and one of the best cockpits I’ve ever come across, these are truly lust worthy cars that no passenger is likely to forget. Add in that this is the original specification of the Mark X and that has the relatively rare four speed, overdrive-equipped manual gearbox, and it becomes the most desirable of the breed you’ll ever find. Of course, they’re not exactly simple vehicles, and any potential owner needs to be aware that although the car’s luxury, panache, and style cannot be equalled anything they’re going to find in a local showroom, it does have some pretty unique needs. But, well taken care of, there’s no reason it can’t provide just as reliable transportation. As with all my posts, you can find the ad via the highlighted blue text atop this post. Now, where did I leave that chequebook…