1962 Ford Falcon = $4200

Up for sale is a nice condtion Ford Falcon. It is a 1962 2 door. Engine size is 170. This car runs great. The glass is all in good condition, no cracks. Tires are good. The body is in good condition, some rust is visible. New carpet, new master cylinder, new shocks front and back, new carb, and generator replaced with alternator. I took a lot of pics, click on the photobucket link to see more… http://s661.photobucket.com/albums/uu339/bobby-ricigliano/ford%20falcon%201962/ If you are interested in seeing the car, email me your phone number or I will not respond.

Well it’s been awhile since I posted anything up here on Cars You Should Buy, but there’s a damned good reason for that… one that I can’t reveal just yet! However, while the cat’s away, the mice will play, and sure enough a quick perusal of Craigslist has dragged more than a few tantalizing vehicles across my monitor’s pixels. This ’62 Falcon is one such vehicle. If you’re a regular reader of CYSB, then you probably already know I’ve got a bit of a hard on for early Falcons, so the temptation of a ’62 Falcon coupe in red and black was just too much to overcome. As with all early Falcons, this one’s sure to be stone-axe reliable and quite fashionable to boot, while the 170 cubic inch engine and automatic gearbox are well-proven powertrain options easily capable of returning pretty decent fuel economy… if not barnstorming power.

However, it’s also not without its issues. As the seller mentions in the ad, there is some rust already visible on the body, and it’s reasonable to assume that the black paintjob isn’t a factory ‘job… in the early sixties, Ford was still lacquering their cars, and their version of the good ole single-stage black paint job was one that lasts absolutely forever… I should know, I had an old Ford pickup in the original gloss black lacquer. This car, on the other hand, appears to have a bit of a rough texture to the paint, which is something the factory finish never would have had. Sure, it would’ve oxidized and faded, but it never would have wrinkled. That said, it doesn’t look to be too bad, and anyone with a little spare time on their hands, some extremely smooth wet/dry sandpaper, and a power buffer could probably have it looking great in no time. Furthermore, although rust is cited in the ad, the engine bay photo shows a well-maintained motor with no signs of rust appearing around the strut towers now around the cowl, which is a very good sign on a car of this age. Likewise, these cars are famously easy collector cars to own, as parts availability is an utter non-issue, which means that anything that might need replacing is readily available and probably only slightly more expensive than dirt. All this, combined with the number of new parts included with the car, make it a pretty compelling vehicle, and one that’s perfectly suited to signal my return to Craigslist prowling! As always, click the blue text above to follow through to the advertisement and contact the seller.

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1966 Chevrolet Stepside Pickup – $3200

“I have an old 1966 Chevrolet stepside truck for sale. It is a straight 6, 4-speed manual truck. It runs and drives great. It has a good body on it. No issues, just cosmetic. Doesn’t leak… Its a great runner. Drove all the way to Hope and back last week no problem. Good on gas too! Everything works on the truck including the horn, signals, headlights, wipers, tail lights, brake lights, gauges, original am radio, interior dome light. It has nice oak fencing on the box which is fairly new. Professionally done to haul firewood and whatever. it has a plywood sheet for the bed and the original wood for the bed is bad so the plywood sheet does the trick. It gets looks where ever I go. Has a bit of rust on rocker and cab corners, but patch work or replacing doesn’t cost much. Dont want to bother painting it because it is a great work truck that gets a lot of attention. I have extra parts. If you buy this truck, you drive it away. AGAIN NO LEAKS AND SUPER EASY TO WORK ON. It truly is a great driver. $3200 bucks …. call 604-725-8449.”

Well, as anyone that’s up into the wee hours can tell you, Vancouver’s evenings have recently taken on that cold bite of moist air that’s been the harbinger of Fall in this region for eons. Rolling in on the building evening fog each night, Autumn signifies shorter days and colder weather ahead and is sure to be accompanied by an ever present threat of precipitation, be it either of the liquid or solid variety. And so too shall it come to pass that car enthusiasts and collectors all over the lower mainland will nestle their prized possessions away for another year. But that doesn’t mean you need to consign yourself to the crappy taupe Corolla in the driveway, at least not so long as there are vehicles like this available. Representing the first year of the Chevrolet C/K pickup truck, this 1966 Chevrolet stepside is the perfect companion for the terrible weather we’ll soon be facing down, and hails from an era in which Chevrolet pickup trucks saw success on a scale that they’d never known before. Recognizing that custom tailoring was a surefire way to win sales, Chevrolet significantly upped their options list for the ’62 model year, offering a whopping 203 different varieties and combinations of pickup truck. Subsequently, sales rose… a lot. In fact, for the three years of ’64, ’65, and ’66, the Chevrolet pickup truck set all-time sales records for Chevrolet, due in large part to that simple fact that buyers could have it any way they wanted it.

This of course means that now, many decades removed from their heyday, you’re pretty much guaranteed never to see another one just like this. The combination of a straight six, manual gearbox, and stepside box means it was probably ordered as a basic work truck, which in turn makes its good condition all the more appreciable. Of course, there are some issues: there are some dents to be found along the hood and what looks to be some wrinkling along the leading edge of the driver’s door, but if the ad is to be believed, it’s at least mechanically sound.  And should any of those dinged or dented parts prove simply too irksome to withstand, there are all manner of online and mail order companies prepared to sell both reproduction and NOS parts for these particular trucks, and the aftermarket support seems to grow by the day for these early C/K pickups. Rapidly gaining merit as a legitimate collector’s truck (as opposed to the frequently hot-rodded ’67 through ’72 models), more and more of these are being bought up by collectors and restorers. This in turn is making them harder and harder to find in workable condition such as this, which is precisely what landed this particular truck a feature here on CYSB: you wouldn’t feel bad tossing a set of skis, a mountain bike, or a beer keg in the back and heading out for some fun. However, any potential buyer would be well served to address the rust the seller has mentioned before winter truly hits, and would be even better served to spend a few days underneath the truck with a paintbrush and some POR-15 to prevent further rot from taking hold. But, overall, a great old truck that’d really be easy for a first time classic car buyer to hop into and enjoy, without the headaches something rarer or more complex might bring.

1969 Volkswagen Type 3 – $3700

1969 VW Type 3, automatic v1600 dual port lowered new mags and tires. Call Dan 604-314-7483.

Although 95% of humanity equates Volkswagen’s existence pre-1974 with the Beetle (the other 5% are intrepid enough to recall the Type 2, or Bus, undoubtedly through a haze of acid trips and marijuana smoke), the reality is that Volkswagen actually offered more than just their tiny rear-engined runabout for public consumption. Like this: the Type 3. More frequently seen in its squareback, station-wagon-esque format, the Volkswagen Type 3 debuted in 1961 as the predecessor to what would become the first generation Passat. Slightly larger than the Beetle and subsequently offering a substantial increase in both passenger and cargo space, the Type 3 retained the famous Volkswagen rear-engined, rear-wheel drive layout made famous by the Beetle, but possessed a larger 1500cc engine (enlarged to 1600cc in ’65) and could be had in four distinct body styles throughout its run, ranging from a small notchback coupé to a flowing sports coupé (better known as a Karmann Ghia here in North America), to squared-off two-door wagon known in the North American market as a squareback, to a flowing fastback coupé body unveiled in 1965. Although relatively popular in Europe, the Type 3 struggled to get a foothold in North America, with the notchback model specifically having trouble finding buyers over its sportier, and more practical siblings.

Which is precisely what makes this one so alluring. Having been produced in 1969, this Type 3 is of a particularly good vintage, coming out one year before Volkswagen muddled the design with a refresh in 1970, but after the adoption of the larger 1600cc engine and front disc brakes in ’66. Of course, being a Volkswagen engine, there’s absolutely no shortage of parts and aftermarket supplies available for it, and it’s entirely reasonable to expect the little four cylinder to keep chugging away for years to come. Sadly, bodywork is a different story, and the rarity of the Type 3 notchback will undoubtedly make any future repairs or parts replacements a bit… er… challenging. That said, Volkswagen owners aren’t so much fanatical about the brand quite so much as they worship it as a surrogate religion, so there’s undoubtedly quite a strong support network of individuals that would be happy to keep an automotive oddity like this on the road! Being a Volkswagen, the maintenance and running order of the drivetrain should take a very, very distant second place to ascertaining the solidity of the bodywork, so bring along your best Bondo-tapping knuckle and/or magnet collection before inspecting this little VW. But given the price point, and the crazy following classic Volkswagen’s enjoy, don’t be surprised if this one goes quick. As always, click on the blue text up top to go to the ad and contact the seller.

1965 Ford F-250 – $3000

For sale is a 65 Ford three quarter ton camper special pick up truck. Has a 79 351 windsor V8 with an auto 3 speed. runs and drives strong, brakes are good, new tires. Asking $3000.00 obo. Call or email. 778-554-7805.

Although summer might have finally deigned those of us relegated to the lower mainland with it’s warm and dry disposition at long last, that doesn’t necessarily translate to drop-top season for everyone. In fact, for a great many people, it’s the time of the year when the automobile takes on its most tool-like properties. Flocking to the outdoors like sunburned lemmings off a heat baked cliff, people rapidly find their automobiles filling up with everything from bikes to boards to boxes of beer, and if you’re driving a Pontiac Firefly of VW Beetle, that can be worrisome. But fear not, because should you find yourself getting a little cramped in amongst the Pabst and single speed bikes, there is respite: this 1965 Ford F-250.

Looking every bit the hipster’s dream, this ’65 Ford F-250 demonstrates everything that was awesome about the mid-sixties: friendly, PlaySkool colours, simple styling, and rugged engineering. Of course, that translates into long stopping distances, questionable fuel economy, and quite possibly some of the heaviest steering ever encountered by man (I learned to drive in a ’73, and it took nearly my entire body mass to spin the tiller whilst stopped). However, what it undoubtedly lacks in capability compared to a modern truck, it more than makes up for in character and reliability. Having beaten my old truck around Richmond, New West, Vancouver, and Port Coquitlam for years after it served as my family’s camper-hauling vacation mobile (accruing something north of 450,000 kms on the way), the big black beast proved incapable of quitting, and served as my daily driver until it was finally traded in for a newer, and nowhere near as reliable truck. Why? Because well modern trucks may stop quicker, go faster, sip gas, and roll their own windows down, they’re also extremely complex. These old Ford pickups having roughly 3.4 moving parts, making them only slightly more complicated than your bottle opener… and how often does that fail? Looking in especially good shape, it’s nearly a guarantee that the paint is new, so do yourself a favour and either bring a trained ear or a magnet to check for fiberglass and bondo beneath. Rust is extremely common on these old trucks, with the worst offenders being the rear of the cab and the cab supports, but replacement parts are readily available from the absolutely mammoth and especially rabid support network that’s cropped up for these old truck. I truly miss my old one, as these old Ford’s represent what I hold to be the golden era in automotive design and manufacture, and it’s the one vehicle of the hundreds I’ve driven that I wish I could have back again… so if this one looks good to you, go ahead and click on the Craigslist ad up top, before I do.

1980 Fiat 124 Spider – $3200

“Fuel injected classic convertible sports car. Designed by Pininfarina (of Ferrari, Maserati, Jaguar, Alfa Romeo, etc. fame) Red/black 5-speed. Excellent mechanical condition., recent paint on a sound body (ie no rust), good exhaust, near new radials on five Fiat factory mags. Air cared and licensed for reliable daily driving. Money needed for tuition. Serious inquiries only. 604-522-6588”

Well, summer appears to have finally descended on the waterlogged streets of Vancouver, and with it so too have the convertibles. Sliding out from beneath tightly wrapped car covers and dug out from mounds of garage-borne hockey gear, skis, and snowshoes, the Miatas, Alfas, and MGs are out in force these days, giving their owners at least one thing to enjoy about commuting in North America’s second-most congested city. And if you’ve found yourself sitting on Highway 99 northbound and looked over at one such slightly-happier-but-probably-still-miserable fellow commuter in just such a car with even the slightest envy, then Cars You Should Buy has found the car for you: a 1980 Fiat Spider. A car produced under no less than three names for a whopping 19 years (it was known as a Fiat 124 Sport Spider form ’66 to ’79, then as a Fiat 2000 Spider from ’79 to ’82, then as a Pininfarina Spider from ’83 to ’85), it provided the auto-buying public with an Italian counterpoint to the ubiquitous MGB that wasn’t an Alfa Romeo, and by the ’80s had earned a reputation for being a pretty standard-issue, old-school sports car. Granted, its 2.0L inline four cylinder did benefit from Bosch fuel injection, and it was capable of producing 105 horsepower for the North American market (European models made 120 horsepower), but it’s combination of a leaf sprung solid rear axle and a pretty pedestrian powerplant left it largely outclassed and outgunned by the then-new rotary powered RX7, Nissan’s lusty inline sixes, and front-engined Porsches.

But 30-odd years later, in Vancouver’s glowing sunshine, it’s the Fiat’s shapely body that really sets it apart from its contemporary (and largely forgotten) competitors. Looking eminently more “Italian” than the British cars of the same era, the Fiat’s at once restrained, and stylish. Sadly it’s also a Fiat, which means it’s a damn good thing that it looks good sitting still, because it might do that a lot. Not renowned for their reliability, the Spiders are notorious for egregious rust issues; not a good thing on a spritely monocoque such as this. Areas to check include the front shock towers, all four wheelarches, around the trunk, the entirety of the floor, inside the sills, the firewall, and at the suspension mounting points. The engine, although relatively robust internally, is typically only slightly better sealed than a sieve, with oil leaks being a frequent occurrence. Check the low-slung oil pan for dings, as it’s gasket surface is a pretty common culprit for leaks, especially after it’s been bounced off a speed bump or two. Also, the timing belt absolutely must be checked on any Fiat Spider you’re thinking of buying, as engine damage that’s best described as “catastrophic” awaits the buyer that doesn’t ensure his engine timing is spot-on: although fuel injected, the engine retains the lobe that drove the carbureted engine’s mechanical fuel pump on its oil pump drive shaft, and should the timing belt break, the nonexistent fuel pump’s drive lobe will interfere with the crank and can crack the block. Similar thought appears to have been put into the Fiat’s electrical system as well, with crappy grounds and corroded connections oftentimes earning their fair share of swear words and anger whilst trying to diagnose an erratic electrical issue. Thankfully, this particular car claims to be rust-free (although I’d be checking that… bring a magnet along!) and although it certainly won’t be utterly reliable forever, it’s a prime example of a great car for someone looking to dip a toe into car maintenance. Simple, well-supported by a network of enthusiasts, and benefitting from 19 years of car (and parts!) production, it’s a simple vehicle that will reward anyone with a halfway decent set of tools, a workshop manual, and a modicum of patience. And if that sounds like you, contact the seller by clicking the hyperlinked advertisement above! And then take that damned back bumper off…

1979 Fiat X1/9 – $1950

The car’s body is a little rough but is very good for NOT having rust. The car in now air-cared and insured. The car will need some work it been stored for the last 19 years and it’s old… this car is not for everyone. but it is a great project for someone that is mechanically inclined. The car drives like a go-cart and will make you want to take the long way home. I can be reached me at (778) 223-0154. Open to offers in person only. Don’t waste our time, and thanks for looking.

The late seventies was not a good time in the motoring world. Representative of the overlap of old-world technology with new world safety, economy, and environmental thinking, the late seventies were marked by 100-horsepower big block V8s strangled by emissions plumbing, and automotive designs marred by strange new crash safety standards. But, beneath the rubber bumpers and ridiculously complex engine plumbing, there were gems… like the Fiat X1/9. A mid-engined sports car actually designed to mimic the styling of contemporary power boats, the X1/9 earned numerous accolades for its sublime handling characteristics; a product of its well-balanced layout and roughly 2,000 pound curb weight.  However, although plenty pretty in its earlier iterations (production began in ’72), the X1/9 fell victim to the same ills that befell every cool car in the late ’70s, and by 1979 found itself visually bound by ridiculous impact-absorbing bumpers and choked by charcoal canisters, air pumps, and EGR valves. That didn’t stop the carbureted 1.5 litre from producing an even 85 horsepower, which was good for a 0-60 time of just over 10 seconds and a top speed on 180 kph, making it as willing a sporty coupe as its dual trunks did a great commuter.

A car that’s always enjoyed a bit of a cult following, the X1/9 was one of the few Fiats produced specifically for inclusion in the U.S. market, meaning there are a surprising number of them still around. However, whilst its cult status ensures plenty of information sources, parts can be slightly more difficult to locate. Although many of the most commonly replaced pieces can be sourced from a few different online retailers, larger, less common parts are often available only through eBay, and one can end up waiting for the correct part to appear. Thankfully, they’re not known for being terribly temperamental, with their easily-remedied electrics being the most common complaint the running gear bears. It is a car made of 1979-era steel though, and rust is very common in the front area around the headlight motors (visible from the front trunk area), in the rear trunk area, and around the wheelarches and sills. On the plus side, it’s not a very large car, so checking for rust shouldn’t take too long, and 19 years of what appears to have been indoor storage may have saved this example from the worst of it! For under $2,000 it’s a great buy that’s sure to appreciate with time, although I don’t know if even I could be convinced to keep its paint scheme… Click on the blue text above to carry through to the advertisement, additional photos, and more contact info!

1973 MG MGB – $3350

Please help – this great little runner sits in my carport and begs for someone to take it for a spin on a regular basis! Unfortunately, I do not have the time to do so… It runs great – quite some work done to the motor (new carb, new headgasket, sparks etc.), new tires, new carpets and more… Just put in a new fan-belt! Great “project” car for someone who has time & love & wants to drive a classic convertible! All it really needs is a paint-job if you wanted it to look splendid! Still insured, so come by & take it for a spin! Put some love & TLC in it & it will be a fantastic MGB! Asking $3350 OBO – make me an offer! Will consider trade for 1985 – 1992 BMW 318i or 325i convertible, manual transmission in proper running condition 🙂 

If you’re looking for a car with which you can enjoy the coming months, well, you may have just found it with this cheap MGB. The quintessential sports car by any and all measures, the MGB has provided the world with the very definition of the term for decades, having been in continual production for 22 years. Beginning in 1960, the classically proportioned and handsome MGB roadster saw three different iterations during its long production run, with the Mark II’s production beginning in 1967, and the Mark III in 1972. This being a ’73, it bears out the improvements that made a Mark III (improved dashboard and heater assembly), but manages to escape the ugliness that came along with 1974’s more stringent crash safety standard and the associated rubber bumper overriders.

Of course, as one of the world’s best-selling sports cars (the Miata only recently claimed that title from the MGB a few years ago), owning an MGB is ridiculously easy. Parts are both widely available as well as quite inexpensive, and the owners groups, clubs, and general proliferation of MGB info makes finding manuals and maintenance instructions as easy as locating a good recipe for bread. Furthermore, they’re uncommonly pleasant to drive, with responsive, lively handling and decent power from the 1.8 litre inline four. Granted, you won’t be setting a blistering pace around Laguna or Mugello with one, but they’ve got quite comfortable interiors, a pleasant ride that doesn’t punish, and return MPG figures in the mid 20’s. This particular example won’t be the prettiest MGB many will have laid eyes upon, but these cars are quite mechanically robust, which means it could be excellent candidate for weeknight restoration work between weekend runs up the Duffy Lake Road. Again, clicking the blue text above will take you through to the ad for contact info.