1963 Jaguar Mark X – $7000

“1963 Jaguar Mark Ten: [Selling because I don’t have time to work on it!]
Description:
– Engine Specifications: 6 cyl, 3.8 litre XK Jaguar ‘S’ type engine; 255 BHP at 5,500 RPM
– Transmission: 4 speed Manual with overdrive,
– Left Hand Drive

– Independent Front & Rear suspension
– Interior: 4 door, 5 seats, luxury front console,

Largest, luxury vehicle manufactured by Jaguar. Almost entirely original features and accessories; including tool kit. Needs some restoration. 36,000 miles showing on original odometer. Original Documentation and brochures. Vehicle is fully functional. Engine runs well. Some aesthetic restoration needed.”

If I’m honest, this particular entry into CYSB immortality might be a little self serving: the Jaguar Mark X/420G has always been a personal dream car of mine. My father has owned a 1974 Jaguar XJ12L for as long as I can remember, and although that car’s combination of grace, space, and pace may leave little to be desired, I always found myself flipping his Classic and Sports Car magazine open to they’re early ’90s expose on Jaguar’s biggest luxury barge. Positively gargantuan and in many ways a would-be competitor for the Bentleys and Rollers of the day, the Mark X borrowed heavily from the popular XKE sports car, stealing both its legendary inline six engine and a widened version of its independent rear suspension. The first Jaguar sedan to feature their well-know suspension system, the Mark X was well-regarded as being a very well sorted car when it came to ride and handling, but would quickly be panned as underpowered. With a curb weight of almost 4,200 pounds and a paltry 3.8 litres’ worth of displacement under the hood, acceleration was tepid for the Mark X, and sales lagged in the all-important American marketplace that was drunk on the power provided by 8.2 litre Cadillac V8s. Jaguar attempted to fix the problem in 1966 with the release of a larger inline six that now displaced 4.2 litres, but the subsequently known 420G fared little better than its predecessor.

However if you’re anything like me, you would rather spend as much time cosseted by the Mark X’s ridiculously English mix of leather and burled walnut as possible, so that brilliant but overladen powertrain isn’t really an issue. With styling that is at once both understated and somehow ostentatious, the Mark X looks almost as good as the Rolls Royces and Bentleys it went up against, and has certainly aged just as well. But it’s the interior that I really love. With wraparound walnut trim, folding tray tables for the back seat, silly amounts of space, and one of the best cockpits I’ve ever come across, these are truly lust worthy cars that no passenger is likely to forget. Add in that this is the original specification of the Mark X and that has the relatively rare four speed, overdrive-equipped manual gearbox, and it becomes the most desirable of the breed you’ll ever find. Of course, they’re not exactly simple vehicles, and any potential owner needs to be aware that although the car’s luxury, panache, and style cannot be equalled anything they’re going to find in a local showroom, it does have some pretty unique needs. But, well taken care of, there’s no reason it can’t provide just as reliable transportation. As with all my posts, you can find the ad via the highlighted blue text atop this post. Now, where did I leave that chequebook…

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1971 MGB GT – $2500

“Car has been sitting in an underground for 9 years. Body of car in great shape. Engine fuel line in need of repair. Call 778 882 8459”

There’s been a lot of American cars on here over the months. Maybe it’s just their dominance in the overall market, or perhaps it’s the undesirable and neglected periods they go through, but for whatever reason old European cars seem to hold their value quite a bit better. Which makes stumbling across something an uncommon as an MGB GT like this such a great find. A Pininifarina designed shooting brake version of the popular MGB sports car, the MGB GT was pretty much identical to its unquestionably more popular drop-top brother, but benefits from beefed up suspension components, in order to deal with the coupe’s added weight. Only marginally slower than the convertible, the GT proved enviably practical; it’s two-door station wagon (also known in Europe as a shooting brake) layout giving legitimate, if cramped, 2+2 seating and a relative dirth of cargo space beneath the rakish rear hatch. After debuting in 1965, the MGB GT saw its demise in North America in 1974, although worldwide exports continued all the way into 1980.

 

The fact that many of the car’s components are identical to the MGB’s makes buying up a second hand MBG GT a very logical way to enter into classic car ownership: as one of the most popular sports cars ever produced, you could probably build an MGB from the ground up with the restoration components available from aftermarket suppliers. In fact, perhaps the largest difference between buying an MGB and an MGB GT is that you needn’t worry so much about the environment’s effects on the car’s interior with the hard top. After all, no one’s ever left the roof off an MGB GT overnight in the rain! But it’s not all roses; as with all old British cars, rust can be a real problem. Check the sills very thoroughly, as they are both rust prone and incredibly important to the car’s unibody construction, likewise with the floors, and trunk. Thankfully, being a car that’s just emerged from 9 years of indoor storage, hopefully it’s in good shape body-wise. Finally, don’t be scared off by the mechanical woes of this particular vehicle, as their simplicity is probably only matched by the cheapness of their parts! Click the blue text to follow through to the ad.

1966 Chrysler 300 – $5100

“1966 4 door Chysler 300. This car is in excellent shape. VERY minimal rust..almost none. Runs and Drives great. Fully insured. Has a 383. Carb is rebuilt and the paint was redone in 2010 would make an amazing lowrider. $5100. Email me and ill get back to you within the same day. Shane”

Although Chrysler seems hell bent on erasing their past, the reality is that the car that brought them into this millennium riding a wave of success owed both its name and much of its attitude to a Chrysler from decades ago: the Chrysler 300. Birthed in 1955 as a line of exclusive and luxurious high performance sedans, the first generation spanned a full decade and has come to be known as the 300 letter series cars for their annual nonsensical alphabetical progression from C-300 (the first cars were actually letterless and are known as 300-A’s in some circles) to their termination in 1965 with the 300L (they skipped “i” as well). For 1966, Chrysler dropped the letters, gave the car a facelift, and introduced the world to the 1966 Chrysler 300. Available in two door hardtop, two door convertible, and four door hardtop variants in the U.S., with Canadian showrooms also endowed with a four door sedan format, the car was no slouch. In fact, you couldn’t get it equipped with anything smaller than Mopar’s 383 big block. Horsepower ratings ranged from 325 to 365 horsepower, with the top rung “TNT” 440 big block producing a prodigal 480 pound feet of torque. Although not as well recognized as the feature-laden and handsomely styled Lincolns and Cadillacs of the day, the Chrysler 300 did set a standard for powerful executive sedans, becoming a sort of BMW M5 or E63 AMG for the burgeoning and Beatles-obsessed American masses.

Of course, the 300’s less prominent status also means you can pick one up for a relative steal compared to contemporary Continentals and Cadillacs, and this here is a prime example of that. Looking lustrous under a fresh coat of paint and sporting a 383, it appears to be in great shape whilst the current insurance would indicate it passed AirCare, and must not run too badly either. In fact, if I were a betting man, I’d wager that it was that particularly annoying local institution that catalyzed the carburetor rebuild, but as always, I could be wrong! Things to watch out for would be any overzealous applications of bondo underneath that fine looking paint, as well as the familiar America sedan rust-prone spots around and under the doors, floors, and trunk. Furthermore, as a pretty luxurious car, any potential buyer will want to keep a weather eye for any missing trim or switchgear. Although relatively well supported, it can be tough to locate exterior (and thus damage prone) trim pieces as well as interior bits and parts. But, if it’s as advertised, then this might be one of those rare classic cars that one could just as easily use to take the family for the softest-riding Sunday afternoon cruise you’ve ever experiences as they could to pick up the boss at the airport on Monday morning. Once again, the blue text up top will take you to Craigslist ad!