1969 Triumph GT6+ – $4500

“Selling my 1969 Triumph GT6+, pretty much stock, very minor mods like twin K&N air filters, stainless exhaust, all electrical works, even the wipers! Newer tires, older paint and body work a few dings and scratches. Interior could use a makeover but it’s a get in and drive, turn key car. Open to offers. I drove this car a few times a week to work and back (64 km round trip) during the summer. The car is lowered. BEST OFFER! Also comes with 1990 miata seats. This is not a show car, it’s not “mint” or perfect!”

reinvigorated by love affair with British cars… but after the abortive post about yesterday’s Land Rover 101 Forward Control, I thought I should follow up with something a bit more in keeping with the blog’s title. So I present to you, dear reader, one of the most underappreciated classic cars on the market today: the 1976 Triumph GT6+. Based upon the better known Spitfire model, the GT6+ grew out of Triumph’s desire to bring their freshly designed (by an Italian, no less) Spitfire roadster to bear upon the coupe market that was, at the time, dominated by the wildly successful MGBGT sports coupe. However smart that idea may have been in a country world renowned for its dampness, initial attempts were complete and utter failures: the little four cylinder found within the Spitfire’s engine bay simply couldn’t cope with the heavier fastback body. But, after fibreglass bodied versions of what was called the Spitfire GT4 won their class at Le Mans, Triumph decided to pursue the matter further, and subsequently installed a 2.0L inline six in place of the four pot to rectify the car’s dismal performance. After dropping the Spitfire prefix and changing the 4 for a 6, the Triumph GT6 was born. A couple years later, the much-maligned swing-axle rear suspension was reengineered to better cope with the increased output of the six cylinder (it had been designed for the four cylinder Spitfire) and reduce the car’s propensity for lifting-throttle oversteer, which gave rise to the GT6+.

And it’s precisely that revised rear suspension that makes GT6+’s like this the ones to look for. Although a little bit less classically styled than the Mark 1 GT6, these Mark 2’s are a damn sight better than the massive bumperette-equipped Mark 3’s, and drive very well indeed. As one would expect of a Spitfire-based coupe, interior space isn’t the car’s forte and rear seats were quite literally optional, but the flowing lines and fastback styling are equal parts British class and race car. From the big clamshell, reverse-hinged hood with its straight-from-pit-lane side clasp closures to the equally racy Le Mans-style filler cap, the GT6 and GT6+both owe a lot of their styling to that aerodynamically designed Le Mans winning body, and look all the more awesome for it. Sadly, you don’t see many of these excellent little cars around as rust, time, club racers and weekend warriors have claimed too many of them. But, that doesn’t mean they’re overly hard to own: with a solid roof and a pretty robust drivetrain, they don’t possess many of the same pitfalls that many old convertibles befall here in the pacific northwest, and their British lineage ensures a vast array of restoration and maintenance parts remain available from a myriad of sources. Overall it’s an excellent car to buy, and buy now, as their low numbers and sleek good looks are sure to galvanize the market towards appreciation at any moment. And with a price of just $4500, this may be one of those rare classic cars that actually proves to be a money-making proposition! As always, the blue text above will carry you through to the Craigslist ad.

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