1966 Chevrolet Stepside Pickup – $3200

“I have an old 1966 Chevrolet stepside truck for sale. It is a straight 6, 4-speed manual truck. It runs and drives great. It has a good body on it. No issues, just cosmetic. Doesn’t leak… Its a great runner. Drove all the way to Hope and back last week no problem. Good on gas too! Everything works on the truck including the horn, signals, headlights, wipers, tail lights, brake lights, gauges, original am radio, interior dome light. It has nice oak fencing on the box which is fairly new. Professionally done to haul firewood and whatever. it has a plywood sheet for the bed and the original wood for the bed is bad so the plywood sheet does the trick. It gets looks where ever I go. Has a bit of rust on rocker and cab corners, but patch work or replacing doesn’t cost much. Dont want to bother painting it because it is a great work truck that gets a lot of attention. I have extra parts. If you buy this truck, you drive it away. AGAIN NO LEAKS AND SUPER EASY TO WORK ON. It truly is a great driver. $3200 bucks …. call 604-725-8449.”

Well, as anyone that’s up into the wee hours can tell you, Vancouver’s evenings have recently taken on that cold bite of moist air that’s been the harbinger of Fall in this region for eons. Rolling in on the building evening fog each night, Autumn signifies shorter days and colder weather ahead and is sure to be accompanied by an ever present threat of precipitation, be it either of the liquid or solid variety. And so too shall it come to pass that car enthusiasts and collectors all over the lower mainland will nestle their prized possessions away for another year. But that doesn’t mean you need to consign yourself to the crappy taupe Corolla in the driveway, at least not so long as there are vehicles like this available. Representing the first year of the Chevrolet C/K pickup truck, this 1966 Chevrolet stepside is the perfect companion for the terrible weather we’ll soon be facing down, and hails from an era in which Chevrolet pickup trucks saw success on a scale that they’d never known before. Recognizing that custom tailoring was a surefire way to win sales, Chevrolet significantly upped their options list for the ’62 model year, offering a whopping 203 different varieties and combinations of pickup truck. Subsequently, sales rose… a lot. In fact, for the three years of ’64, ’65, and ’66, the Chevrolet pickup truck set all-time sales records for Chevrolet, due in large part to that simple fact that buyers could have it any way they wanted it.

This of course means that now, many decades removed from their heyday, you’re pretty much guaranteed never to see another one just like this. The combination of a straight six, manual gearbox, and stepside box means it was probably ordered as a basic work truck, which in turn makes its good condition all the more appreciable. Of course, there are some issues: there are some dents to be found along the hood and what looks to be some wrinkling along the leading edge of the driver’s door, but if the ad is to be believed, it’s at least mechanically sound.  And should any of those dinged or dented parts prove simply too irksome to withstand, there are all manner of online and mail order companies prepared to sell both reproduction and NOS parts for these particular trucks, and the aftermarket support seems to grow by the day for these early C/K pickups. Rapidly gaining merit as a legitimate collector’s truck (as opposed to the frequently hot-rodded ’67 through ’72 models), more and more of these are being bought up by collectors and restorers. This in turn is making them harder and harder to find in workable condition such as this, which is precisely what landed this particular truck a feature here on CYSB: you wouldn’t feel bad tossing a set of skis, a mountain bike, or a beer keg in the back and heading out for some fun. However, any potential buyer would be well served to address the rust the seller has mentioned before winter truly hits, and would be even better served to spend a few days underneath the truck with a paintbrush and some POR-15 to prevent further rot from taking hold. But, overall, a great old truck that’d really be easy for a first time classic car buyer to hop into and enjoy, without the headaches something rarer or more complex might bring.

1980 Fiat 124 Spider – $3200

“Fuel injected classic convertible sports car. Designed by Pininfarina (of Ferrari, Maserati, Jaguar, Alfa Romeo, etc. fame) Red/black 5-speed. Excellent mechanical condition., recent paint on a sound body (ie no rust), good exhaust, near new radials on five Fiat factory mags. Air cared and licensed for reliable daily driving. Money needed for tuition. Serious inquiries only. 604-522-6588″

Well, summer appears to have finally descended on the waterlogged streets of Vancouver, and with it so too have the convertibles. Sliding out from beneath tightly wrapped car covers and dug out from mounds of garage-borne hockey gear, skis, and snowshoes, the Miatas, Alfas, and MGs are out in force these days, giving their owners at least one thing to enjoy about commuting in North America’s second-most congested city. And if you’ve found yourself sitting on Highway 99 northbound and looked over at one such slightly-happier-but-probably-still-miserable fellow commuter in just such a car with even the slightest envy, then Cars You Should Buy has found the car for you: a 1980 Fiat Spider. A car produced under no less than three names for a whopping 19 years (it was known as a Fiat 124 Sport Spider form ’66 to ’79, then as a Fiat 2000 Spider from ’79 to ’82, then as a Pininfarina Spider from ’83 to ’85), it provided the auto-buying public with an Italian counterpoint to the ubiquitous MGB that wasn’t an Alfa Romeo, and by the ’80s had earned a reputation for being a pretty standard-issue, old-school sports car. Granted, its 2.0L inline four cylinder did benefit from Bosch fuel injection, and it was capable of producing 105 horsepower for the North American market (European models made 120 horsepower), but it’s combination of a leaf sprung solid rear axle and a pretty pedestrian powerplant left it largely outclassed and outgunned by the then-new rotary powered RX7, Nissan’s lusty inline sixes, and front-engined Porsches.

But 30-odd years later, in Vancouver’s glowing sunshine, it’s the Fiat’s shapely body that really sets it apart from its contemporary (and largely forgotten) competitors. Looking eminently more “Italian” than the British cars of the same era, the Fiat’s at once restrained, and stylish. Sadly it’s also a Fiat, which means it’s a damn good thing that it looks good sitting still, because it might do that a lot. Not renowned for their reliability, the Spiders are notorious for egregious rust issues; not a good thing on a spritely monocoque such as this. Areas to check include the front shock towers, all four wheelarches, around the trunk, the entirety of the floor, inside the sills, the firewall, and at the suspension mounting points. The engine, although relatively robust internally, is typically only slightly better sealed than a sieve, with oil leaks being a frequent occurrence. Check the low-slung oil pan for dings, as it’s gasket surface is a pretty common culprit for leaks, especially after it’s been bounced off a speed bump or two. Also, the timing belt absolutely must be checked on any Fiat Spider you’re thinking of buying, as engine damage that’s best described as “catastrophic” awaits the buyer that doesn’t ensure his engine timing is spot-on: although fuel injected, the engine retains the lobe that drove the carbureted engine’s mechanical fuel pump on its oil pump drive shaft, and should the timing belt break, the nonexistent fuel pump’s drive lobe will interfere with the crank and can crack the block. Similar thought appears to have been put into the Fiat’s electrical system as well, with crappy grounds and corroded connections oftentimes earning their fair share of swear words and anger whilst trying to diagnose an erratic electrical issue. Thankfully, this particular car claims to be rust-free (although I’d be checking that… bring a magnet along!) and although it certainly won’t be utterly reliable forever, it’s a prime example of a great car for someone looking to dip a toe into car maintenance. Simple, well-supported by a network of enthusiasts, and benefitting from 19 years of car (and parts!) production, it’s a simple vehicle that will reward anyone with a halfway decent set of tools, a workshop manual, and a modicum of patience. And if that sounds like you, contact the seller by clicking the hyperlinked advertisement above! And then take that damned back bumper off…

1973 MG MGB – $3350

Please help – this great little runner sits in my carport and begs for someone to take it for a spin on a regular basis! Unfortunately, I do not have the time to do so… It runs great – quite some work done to the motor (new carb, new headgasket, sparks etc.), new tires, new carpets and more… Just put in a new fan-belt! Great “project” car for someone who has time & love & wants to drive a classic convertible! All it really needs is a paint-job if you wanted it to look splendid! Still insured, so come by & take it for a spin! Put some love & TLC in it & it will be a fantastic MGB! Asking $3350 OBO – make me an offer! Will consider trade for 1985 – 1992 BMW 318i or 325i convertible, manual transmission in proper running condition :) 

If you’re looking for a car with which you can enjoy the coming months, well, you may have just found it with this cheap MGB. The quintessential sports car by any and all measures, the MGB has provided the world with the very definition of the term for decades, having been in continual production for 22 years. Beginning in 1960, the classically proportioned and handsome MGB roadster saw three different iterations during its long production run, with the Mark II’s production beginning in 1967, and the Mark III in 1972. This being a ’73, it bears out the improvements that made a Mark III (improved dashboard and heater assembly), but manages to escape the ugliness that came along with 1974′s more stringent crash safety standard and the associated rubber bumper overriders.

Of course, as one of the world’s best-selling sports cars (the Miata only recently claimed that title from the MGB a few years ago), owning an MGB is ridiculously easy. Parts are both widely available as well as quite inexpensive, and the owners groups, clubs, and general proliferation of MGB info makes finding manuals and maintenance instructions as easy as locating a good recipe for bread. Furthermore, they’re uncommonly pleasant to drive, with responsive, lively handling and decent power from the 1.8 litre inline four. Granted, you won’t be setting a blistering pace around Laguna or Mugello with one, but they’ve got quite comfortable interiors, a pleasant ride that doesn’t punish, and return MPG figures in the mid 20′s. This particular example won’t be the prettiest MGB many will have laid eyes upon, but these cars are quite mechanically robust, which means it could be excellent candidate for weeknight restoration work between weekend runs up the Duffy Lake Road. Again, clicking the blue text above will take you through to the ad for contact info.

1964 Mercedes Benz 220 – $2500

“1964 Mercedes 220, gasoline straight-6 cylinder, twin carbs, 4-speed column shifter. The car looks and runs well, but is testing slightly below emissions requirements. Contact Susan at 778-828-8993.”

In 1964, if you were a wealthy young man, you lusted after the likes of Ford’s Mustang or Ferrari’s GTO. If you were a wealthy old man, you probably found yourself looking for a Rolls Royce or Bentley. And if you were a wealthy despot, it would be a Mercedes sedan that filled your dreams. Big, comfy, understated, and yet gloriously luxurious in top trim, they were the perfect car for the discerning dictator. Spanning a price range that brought their sedan line from basic, but solidly built runabouts all the way up to super-luxury limos, Mercedes offered three different chassis codes in the mid-sixties, with the popular WIII code indicating those two- and four-door chassis fitted with the venerable 2.2 litre six cylinder (W110 indicates four cylinder-powered cars, while W112s received the 3.0L inline six).

This specific car, a W111 220Sb, represents the middle of the W111 lineup. Thanks to the dual carburettors, it boasted 15 more horsepower than the base 220b, bringing the total to 110, but still rallied 10 horsepower less under the hood than the rare Bosch fuel injection-equipped 220SEb. Good for a top speed of 103 miles per hour, it was no slouch out on the Autobahn, but it’s considerable mass and long gearing conspired against it under acceleration, and the 220Sb struggled with a lethargic 15-second 0-60 time. However, when you’re in the interior of a car like this, replete with possibly the most interesting gauge arrangement ever, you may appreciate the slower pace the big Benz requires. And as the most popular of the W111s, the 220Sb is a relatively common collector’s vehicle, and still boasts a pretty staunch enthusiast base. However, that doesn’t make it the easiest vehicle to own, with parts prices and availability requiring both a serious level of commitment to source and purchase. But, this is a unique vehicle offered at a great price, and given their continued rarity, there’s no doubt in my mind that they’re on the cusp of becoming very, very desirable automobiles indeed. And although it may be testing slightly below Aircare requirements, the popularity and robustness of the 2.2L six cylinder ensures that any mechanical issues should be easily rectified. And hey, who knows how much longer we’ll even have Aircare for, anyway!

1963 Jaguar Mark X – $7000

“1963 Jaguar Mark Ten: [Selling because I don't have time to work on it!]
Description:
- Engine Specifications: 6 cyl, 3.8 litre XK Jaguar ‘S’ type engine; 255 BHP at 5,500 RPM
- Transmission: 4 speed Manual with overdrive,
- Left Hand Drive

- Independent Front & Rear suspension
- Interior: 4 door, 5 seats, luxury front console,

Largest, luxury vehicle manufactured by Jaguar. Almost entirely original features and accessories; including tool kit. Needs some restoration. 36,000 miles showing on original odometer. Original Documentation and brochures. Vehicle is fully functional. Engine runs well. Some aesthetic restoration needed.”

If I’m honest, this particular entry into CYSB immortality might be a little self serving: the Jaguar Mark X/420G has always been a personal dream car of mine. My father has owned a 1974 Jaguar XJ12L for as long as I can remember, and although that car’s combination of grace, space, and pace may leave little to be desired, I always found myself flipping his Classic and Sports Car magazine open to they’re early ’90s expose on Jaguar’s biggest luxury barge. Positively gargantuan and in many ways a would-be competitor for the Bentleys and Rollers of the day, the Mark X borrowed heavily from the popular XKE sports car, stealing both its legendary inline six engine and a widened version of its independent rear suspension. The first Jaguar sedan to feature their well-know suspension system, the Mark X was well-regarded as being a very well sorted car when it came to ride and handling, but would quickly be panned as underpowered. With a curb weight of almost 4,200 pounds and a paltry 3.8 litres’ worth of displacement under the hood, acceleration was tepid for the Mark X, and sales lagged in the all-important American marketplace that was drunk on the power provided by 8.2 litre Cadillac V8s. Jaguar attempted to fix the problem in 1966 with the release of a larger inline six that now displaced 4.2 litres, but the subsequently known 420G fared little better than its predecessor.

However if you’re anything like me, you would rather spend as much time cosseted by the Mark X’s ridiculously English mix of leather and burled walnut as possible, so that brilliant but overladen powertrain isn’t really an issue. With styling that is at once both understated and somehow ostentatious, the Mark X looks almost as good as the Rolls Royces and Bentleys it went up against, and has certainly aged just as well. But it’s the interior that I really love. With wraparound walnut trim, folding tray tables for the back seat, silly amounts of space, and one of the best cockpits I’ve ever come across, these are truly lust worthy cars that no passenger is likely to forget. Add in that this is the original specification of the Mark X and that has the relatively rare four speed, overdrive-equipped manual gearbox, and it becomes the most desirable of the breed you’ll ever find. Of course, they’re not exactly simple vehicles, and any potential owner needs to be aware that although the car’s luxury, panache, and style cannot be equalled anything they’re going to find in a local showroom, it does have some pretty unique needs. But, well taken care of, there’s no reason it can’t provide just as reliable transportation. As with all my posts, you can find the ad via the highlighted blue text atop this post. Now, where did I leave that chequebook…

1971 MGB GT – $2500

“Car has been sitting in an underground for 9 years. Body of car in great shape. Engine fuel line in need of repair. Call 778 882 8459″

There’s been a lot of American cars on here over the months. Maybe it’s just their dominance in the overall market, or perhaps it’s the undesirable and neglected periods they go through, but for whatever reason old European cars seem to hold their value quite a bit better. Which makes stumbling across something an uncommon as an MGB GT like this such a great find. A Pininifarina designed shooting brake version of the popular MGB sports car, the MGB GT was pretty much identical to its unquestionably more popular drop-top brother, but benefits from beefed up suspension components, in order to deal with the coupe’s added weight. Only marginally slower than the convertible, the GT proved enviably practical; it’s two-door station wagon (also known in Europe as a shooting brake) layout giving legitimate, if cramped, 2+2 seating and a relative dirth of cargo space beneath the rakish rear hatch. After debuting in 1965, the MGB GT saw its demise in North America in 1974, although worldwide exports continued all the way into 1980.

 

The fact that many of the car’s components are identical to the MGB’s makes buying up a second hand MBG GT a very logical way to enter into classic car ownership: as one of the most popular sports cars ever produced, you could probably build an MGB from the ground up with the restoration components available from aftermarket suppliers. In fact, perhaps the largest difference between buying an MGB and an MGB GT is that you needn’t worry so much about the environment’s effects on the car’s interior with the hard top. After all, no one’s ever left the roof off an MGB GT overnight in the rain! But it’s not all roses; as with all old British cars, rust can be a real problem. Check the sills very thoroughly, as they are both rust prone and incredibly important to the car’s unibody construction, likewise with the floors, and trunk. Thankfully, being a car that’s just emerged from 9 years of indoor storage, hopefully it’s in good shape body-wise. Finally, don’t be scared off by the mechanical woes of this particular vehicle, as their simplicity is probably only matched by the cheapness of their parts! Click the blue text to follow through to the ad.

1966 Chrysler 300 – $5100

“1966 4 door Chysler 300. This car is in excellent shape. VERY minimal rust..almost none. Runs and Drives great. Fully insured. Has a 383. Carb is rebuilt and the paint was redone in 2010 would make an amazing lowrider. $5100. Email me and ill get back to you within the same day. Shane”

Although Chrysler seems hell bent on erasing their past, the reality is that the car that brought them into this millennium riding a wave of success owed both its name and much of its attitude to a Chrysler from decades ago: the Chrysler 300. Birthed in 1955 as a line of exclusive and luxurious high performance sedans, the first generation spanned a full decade and has come to be known as the 300 letter series cars for their annual nonsensical alphabetical progression from C-300 (the first cars were actually letterless and are known as 300-A’s in some circles) to their termination in 1965 with the 300L (they skipped “i” as well). For 1966, Chrysler dropped the letters, gave the car a facelift, and introduced the world to the 1966 Chrysler 300. Available in two door hardtop, two door convertible, and four door hardtop variants in the U.S., with Canadian showrooms also endowed with a four door sedan format, the car was no slouch. In fact, you couldn’t get it equipped with anything smaller than Mopar’s 383 big block. Horsepower ratings ranged from 325 to 365 horsepower, with the top rung “TNT” 440 big block producing a prodigal 480 pound feet of torque. Although not as well recognized as the feature-laden and handsomely styled Lincolns and Cadillacs of the day, the Chrysler 300 did set a standard for powerful executive sedans, becoming a sort of BMW M5 or E63 AMG for the burgeoning and Beatles-obsessed American masses.

Of course, the 300′s less prominent status also means you can pick one up for a relative steal compared to contemporary Continentals and Cadillacs, and this here is a prime example of that. Looking lustrous under a fresh coat of paint and sporting a 383, it appears to be in great shape whilst the current insurance would indicate it passed AirCare, and must not run too badly either. In fact, if I were a betting man, I’d wager that it was that particularly annoying local institution that catalyzed the carburetor rebuild, but as always, I could be wrong! Things to watch out for would be any overzealous applications of bondo underneath that fine looking paint, as well as the familiar America sedan rust-prone spots around and under the doors, floors, and trunk. Furthermore, as a pretty luxurious car, any potential buyer will want to keep a weather eye for any missing trim or switchgear. Although relatively well supported, it can be tough to locate exterior (and thus damage prone) trim pieces as well as interior bits and parts. But, if it’s as advertised, then this might be one of those rare classic cars that one could just as easily use to take the family for the softest-riding Sunday afternoon cruise you’ve ever experiences as they could to pick up the boss at the airport on Monday morning. Once again, the blue text up top will take you to Craigslist ad!

1969 ChevyVan – $3900

“Strong running 350, automatic with shift kit, 12-bolt Posi, Dual Flowmaster’s, Alpine stereo. 604-351-5234. Ask for Tony.”

In the sixties, there was a very strange movement out of station wagons and sedans, and into vans. At one point, they even earned themselves the cover of Hot Rod Magazine. Although that particular point in time has become the low water mark for that magazine, vans are on the cusp of becoming just that cool again. With styling that looks equal parts Pan Am and Mad Men, a pretty good helping of practicality, and somehow lacking the environmentally unfriendly attitude of their contemporaries, they’re going to catch on like a cold as soon as the hipster crowd realizes they exist. And when it comes to classic, hip vans, it doesn’t get much better than this: a 1969 ChevyVan. Yes, that’s right, it’s actually called a ChevyVan. The last year of the second generation ChevyVan (it never gets old, does it?), it marks the last time a ChevyVan (no, it doesn’t!) would look more at home on a beach than in Chester Molester’s driveway. Available in a myriad of configurations that really haven’t changed between 1969 and the current Chevy Express van, you could order your van in one of two different wheelbases; either the surprisingly short 90″ or then-new 108″ wheelbase. Furthermore, buyers could choose from either the basic cargo-oriented ChevyVan, or the passenger-prepared Sportvan Custom, or even the luxurious Sportvan Deluxe. While ChevyVans made do with the basic slab-sided panelling and spartan interiors, the Sportvans got an additional pair of barn doors on the passenger side, chrome bumpers, a tons of windows, more seats, and two tone paint.

That, of course, makes the Sportvans a wee bit more desirable than this basic ChevyVan. But one shouldn’t discount the ridiculous practicality of a proper van-sized van, and in that regard, this ChevyVan could prove incredibly useful to anyone looking to haul things around occasionally. Equipped with the range-topping 350 small block V8 and TH350 three-speed automatic, it’s certainly capable of fulfilling the role of workhorse without breaking a sweat, and would have had a respectable 255 horsepower when new. Paired with a 12 bolt Posi-Traction rear end, one would expect the drivetrain to be totally reliable, but as with most vans, the drivetrain isn’t exactly the biggest concern. No, with all that sheetmetal, rust has always been the van’s arch-nemesis. With ChevyVans specifically, you typically want to ensure that the floors, corners, and rocker panels are sound before buying, so it might be a good idea to either bring a magnet or someone that knows how to tap on steel. But, if sound, there’s really nothing stopping this unique little vehicle from surviving another 43 years. With a strong enthusiasts community (they even have their own magazines now, so they don’t need to steal Hot Rod!), classic vans are even getting some aftermarket restoration parts support from the larger suppliers, so ownership shouldn’t be a chore. And wouldn’t it look so cool with your single speed commuter bike and second hand guitar in the back? Click on the blue text to follow through to the Craigslist ad.

1960 Vauxhall Victor Super – $1730

“1960 Vauxhall Victor real classic car, this car runs, and every thing works, all original paint, motor. Easy classic plates; cheap to drive and insure. Fun cool ride, this car has been in dry storage 25 yrs. Beautiful in side, get in the classic car game cheap no overseas b/s or pay pay. 778 889 9135 same owner for many years well looked after, no hurry to sell need nothing drive home”

In 1957, Vauxhall decided that they needed a new large family sedan to replace the aging (but awesomely named) Wyvern. Looking towards their American cousins for inspiration, this was the result: the Vauxhall Victor. Before it’s reinvention in 1961, it would become Britian’s most exported car, earning accolades for its classy 1957 Chevy Bel Air-inspired styling and reputation for robustness. However, there were some key differences that set the Victor and the Bel Air apart, and a huge one was under the hood where drivers would find, instead of a sexy small block V8, a familiar 1.5 litre four cylinder producing 55 horsepower. Borrowed from the Wyvern, General Motors’ engineers outfitted the engine with a higher compression ratio (7.8:1 as opposed to the Wyvern’s 6.8:1), which subsequently required the car run Premium fuel. However, with recorded fuel economy in the 31 mpg realm, it wasn’t exactly an expensive car to run, regardless of what you put in the tank.

Of course, there probably isn’t much in this particular Victor’s tank. Having been in dry storage for 25 years, it looks to be in excellent shape for its age, and although the mechanical components should probably be sorted before driving it any great distance, one cannot stress the value of a complete car quite enough. Although it was a popular export, it isn’t exactly a common car here in North America, and seeing as this is the Super model (which simply denoted extra trim), I imagine that trying to find any of the body cladding, badges, or interior pieces could prove nigh impossible… so it’s a good thing this car has them all! Furthermore, having the original paint is a real boon, as it appears as if it could use little more than a quick scrub with a buffing wheel. Sure, it’ll probably bear a few scuffs and scratches, but don’t we all? In any case, at just $1,730 it’s an absolute steal.

1973 Land Rover Forward Control – $25000

“1973 Land Rover 101 Forward Control, 1.5L 3B diesel with AXT turbocharger; 5 speed gearbox. ARB diff lockers front and rear; electric 10,000 lb. winch; custom free-wheeling hubs. Six Michelin tires. Very low mileage for its age. Comes with brand new canvas (not shown). For appointment to view, contact Jay 604-760-5350. Currently in storage.”

When it comes to awesome vehicles, the Land Rover 101″ Forward Control is right near the top of the list. A little known variant of the brand’s all-conquering Series IIA and Series III trucks, the forward control fulfilled the British military’s need for an air-transportable 1-tonne utility truck, and did so in much the same manner as did Volvo’s Laplander and Steyr-Puch’s Pinzgauer. Produced in a variety of formats for the military alone (there were no civilian forward controls manufactured), the forward control could be had in radio car, ambulance, and truck layouts, with varying body styles and widths befitting their specific roles; radio trucks typically possess an enclosed shell that is no wider than the front end, while ambulances bulge outward to allow additional room for stretchers and medical equipment. Trucks, such as the one pictured here, feature your standard issue, military-style folding bed sides and typically benefit from the fitment of a hoop set and canvas roof.

Although this blog may be called “Cars You Should Buy,” I fear this first entry after the holiday season breaks with tradition and brings you a car you most certainly should not, regardless of how cool it may appear. Having had the unfortunate fortune of undergoing an engine and transmission swap at some point, the truck has lost one of its best features; the ability to use a huge amount of standard Land Rover parts. Whilst Laplanders, Pinzgauers, and even Unimogs are specific vehicles with very little parts sharing with their stablemates, the 101 utilized much of the same running gear as the regular Land Rover Series IIA and III trucks, which means that any current owner can take advantage of a huge parts supply network. Of course, that pedestrian design also makes it a bit less capable than the similarly-sized, portal-axle-equipped forward control trucks from Steyr, Volvo, and Mercedes, and the prices typically reflect that. It also doesn’t help that due to their relatively awkward looks, punishing ride, and niche status, they simply don’t command much of a market. Readily available in the UK for around nine grand in restored condition, and typically carrying a $2,500 shipping cost, this truck’s $25,000 price tag is absolutely ridiculous. But, if nothing else, it does serve as a great excuse to search eBay Motors UK for a better one. As always, interested parties can click the blue text alongside the topmost picture to navigate to the seller’s Craigslist ad… but I wouldn’t recommend it.